The Spirit of Creativity

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Creativity is not simply an artistic piece; it sends an image or message to our brain.  The Most High God is the Source of all creativity–the Spirit gives life to it as seen in Creation (Genesis 1).  God called for creativity when He began to fashion his House (Exodus 31:1-6).  Certainly, we need to make sure our goal is to bring glory to God with the creative works of our hands.  Did you know that at different times the Church–the people of God–set a standard for creative expression?

Think about David as he lead worship dancing before the Ark of God (1 Chronicles 15:25-28), Michelangelo’s Sistine Chapel, Bach’s oratorios or Handel’s Messiah.  The Bride of Christ used to see herself as responsible for telling the story of the Lord by creating beautiful music, graphics, and writings; it was a way to “connect” many more people with the gospel, as well as a way to ascribe glory to our God. 

I believe many of the organized churches, today, have lost their vision and creativity in worship.  When did that happen?  These are my thoughts and many are based on experience.  The Church has valued the “restraints of religion” more than the freshness of God’s creativity.  By allowing fear to rule the worship environment–the fear of losing control–dryness has replaced divine INSPIRATION or the supernatural endowment of the Spirit.  God’s people must begin anew, because we will never grow in such an inappropriate enviroment.   We were created for a connection with the Living Vine (John 15), not dead religion.  God set before us life and death, but encouraged us to, “Choose life!” (Deuteronomy 30:19)

In our creativity, we have an invitation to look like our Father.  We must have the right “heart” and priorities.  The Word of God must be in the center of all we do; the foundation upon which we build our lives and our worship.   We must prepare our hearts to respond to the vital work of the Spirit in our worship times, because the work of the Spirit is to lift up and edify Jesus Christ.  Remember, the purpose of corporate worship is to come and bring an offering of ourselves to the Lord.  Doesn’t it make sense that God would fill us and inhabit our midst with the glory of His presence every time we get together when we please Him? 

“If the Holy Spirit should come again upon us as in earlier times, visiting church congregations with the sweet but fiery breath of Pentecost, we would be greater Christians and holier souls.  Beyond that, we would also be greater poets and greater artists and greater lovers of God and His universe.” A.W. Tozer 

 

 

(Excerpts taken from Robert Stearns Prepare Ye the Way)